sophrosyne

sophrosyne

noun

  1. self control, temperance, soundness of mind

    from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Visuals for sophrosyne

Examples

  • A dialogue in which Socrates engages a handsome and popular boy in a conversation about the meaning of sophrosyne, a Greek word usually translated into English as "temperance", "self-control", or "restraint".

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • A dialogue in which Socrates engages a handsome and popular boy in a conversation about the meaning of sophrosyne, a Greek word usually translated into English as "temperance",

    Jon Aquino's Mental Garden

  • The ascetical message also resonated well with Hellenistic ideas about the "sober life" of the wise man or woman sophrosyne, and much of late first and second century Christian literature, such as the Didache, the Clementine Letters or the Shepherd of Hermas, began to stress the need for this wise lifestyle kind of sobriety as a fundamental character of general Christian discipleship.

    Norris J. Chumley, Ph.D.: The Compelling Spiritual Discipline Of Asceticism

  • Viewers rooted for the Virginia kid with shaggy brown hair and glasses, who fidgeted with his hands as he spelled such words as "oriflamme" and "sophrosyne."

    'Fustanella' is N.Va. teen's killer bee word

  • Justice and self-control [sophrosyne], and virtue in general — these are all various Acts of Intelligence: they are consequently not primary genera; they are posterior to a genus, that is to say, they are species.

    The Six Enneads.

Wikipedia

Sophrosyne (Greek: σωφροσύνη) is an ancient Greek concept of an ideal of excellence of character and soundness of mind, which when combined in one well-balanced individual leads to other qualities, such as temperance, moderation, prudence, purity, and self-control. In other languages there is no equivalent word.

The word is found in the writings of Plato, and its meaning debated in his dialogue Charmides. Plato's high estimation of sophrosyne may have been influenced by Heraclitus's fragment 112, which states: "Sophrosyne is the greatest virtue, and wisdom is speaking and acting the trust, paying heed to the nature of things." (σωφρονεῖν ἀρετὴ μεγίστη, καὶ σοφίη ἀληθέα λέγειν καὶ ποιεῖν κατὰ φύσιν ἐπαίοντας.)[1]

In Greek literature sophrosyne is considered an important quality, and is expressed in opposition to the concept of hubris. A noted example of this occurs in Homer's The Iliad. When Agamemnon decides to take the queen, Briseis, away from Achilles, it is seen as Agamemnon behaving with hubris and lacking sophrosyne.[2] Sophrosyne is a theme in the play Hippolytus by Euripides, where sophrosyne is represented by the goddess Artemis and is personified by the character Hippolytus.[3]

An adjectival form is "sophron".[4]

  1. ^ Hyland, D. A., Plato and the Question of Beauty (Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008), p. 105.
  2. ^ North, Helen. Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature. Cornell studies in classical philology. Volume 35, issue 67, Issue 67. Cornell University Press (1966)
  3. ^ Euripides. Hippolytus. Bagg, Robert. Introduction. Oxford University Press. 1973 ISBN 978-0-19-507290-7
  4. ^ Euripides. Hippolytos. Oxford University Press. (1973) 978-0-19-507290-7 p. 6